Meg Hansen, John McClaughry and David Flemming write 40+ commentaries a year discussing the most pressing public policy issues in Vermont. These are published online and in newspapers throughout the state, including VT Digger, the Caledonian Record, the Rutland Herald, the St. Albans Messenger, the Bennington Banner, Vermont Biz, TrueNorthReports, Times Argus, the Eagle Times and Vermont Daily. If you see an EAI commentary in your local newspaper, shoot us an email! And if you don't see our commentaries in your local papers, let your newspaper editors know.

Commentary: Shrinking Vermont’s abysmal minority voting gap

In 2020, about 20% of Black citizens voted in Vermont’s general election, well short of a Census-estimated 70% of white Vermonters. That’s the second largest gap in the country. 

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Commentary: No Gasoline Powered Car Ban Until 2035!

A rule progressing through the Scott Administration will require that all Vermont cars, SUVs, minivans and light duty trucks sold or registered in Vermont must be “California compliant”, that is, be electric or possibly fuel cell powered, by the 2035 model year. The state’s environmental machine believes getting rid of carbon dioxide emissions from vehicles will somehow arrest the menace of climate change. It won’t, but it will exterminate consumer choice of what to drive. And of course there’ll be no legislative vote.

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Commentary: The Harrowing Medical Legacy of 9/11

Our collective mind burns with images of the Twin Towers collapsing on September 11, 2001, thousands running for their lives from billows of noxious dust, and New York City shrouded in black smoke and ash. This cataclysm of terror has been imprinted in our cultural memory by gut-wrenching personal stories, videos, photographs, vigils, and memorials. But memories and artefacts alone do not constitute the brutal legacy of  9/11. 

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Saving Our Democracy

The Left has made “saving our democracy” a leading election year national concern. But democracy is safe – what is threatened is the Rule of Law, and it has been endangered by Presidents Obama, Trump and Biden alike.

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Commentary: Looking at the Big Picture in Energy Options

Back in the mid-2000’s when I was co-teaching environmental science courses, I discovered “Will You Join Us?” (WYJU) an online game developed by Chevron, where players had to power up a simulated city drawing on a variety of energy sources. The game’s scoring system required players to evaluate each energy source on three distinct criteria: “Affordability,” “Security” and “Environment.”

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Return of the Curse of Diocletian

The “Inflation Reduction Act” authorizes Medicare to “negotiate prices” with the pharmaceutical industry. That is to say, impose price controls on their products purchased through Medicare, meaning that prices will shoot up for everyone in the private market. Emperor Diocletian tried price controls in 301AD, wrecked the Roman economy, and was forced to abdicate the throne.

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Commentary: Candidate Questions for 2022

Here are sixteen fairly stated and timely questions voters should put to those seeking legislative office this November. Voters deserve to know where office seekers stand. That’s what makes democracy work.

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Commentary: The Climate Council’s “Carbon Tax PLUS” Agenda for Vermont

As gasoline prices hover around record highs, putting tremendous pressure on family budgets, stressing businesses, and making life generally more expensive, the Vermont Climate Council is coming up with a plan to make the problem worse. Much worse.

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Commentary: A Victory for the Rule of Law

The Left has denounced the Supreme Court’s holding in West Virginia vs. EPA as a gift to big corporate polluters. It – and others – should be cheering this decision as a victory for democracy and the rule of law, over runaway agency regulation to effectuate what Congress failed to authorize.

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Commentary: Seeking a middle path on American racial history

With discussion of how to teach American racial history reaching a fever a pitch at school board meetings across America, there are lessons to be learned from a recent exchange in St. Albans. While progressive leaders like to frame the discussion as a choice between reflecting on racial history inside and outside of schools (usually with a Black Lives Matter flavor) or not reflecting at all, the choice is more complicated than that.

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