Larry Labor

2022 Legislative Session


Add 27 days for “Default Proceed” Firearm Background Checks (Notte Amendment of S.30). Passed on January 27, 2022 by a vote of 97-49. This would lengthen the time some Vermont firearm applications take from 3 to 30 days. Those voting YES believe this amended bill could “potentially save lives,” by preventing dangerous police retrievals of guns for those who ultimately fail federal background checks. Those voting NO point to the rights to firearms protected in the Vermont and US Constitutions. They note that failed background checks have a shelf life of 30 days, meaning the applicant could be caught in an endless cycle.

Labor - NO

Protect Doctor-Patient Privacy during Firearm Disputes (Donahue Motion of S.30). Protect Doctor-Patient Privacy during Firearm Disputes (Donahue Motion of S.30). Failed on January 27, 2022 by a vote of 55-90. The Donahue Motion would send S.30 and the Notte amendment to the House Healthcare Committee for further review. Those voting YES believe that greater deliberation was needed for discovering how S.30 could impact Vermonter’s doctor/patient relationships, especially given the possibility of S.30 discriminating against those with mental health or addiction issues from seeking help. Those voting NO believe that no such analysis was necessary.

Labor - YES

Guarantee "Personal Reproductive Autonomy" (Proposal 5). Passed on February 8, 2022 by a vote of 107-41. Proposal 5 would amend Vermont’s Constitution, adding “that an individual’s right to personal reproductive autonomy is central to the liberty and dignity to determine one’s own life course and shall not be denied or infringed unless justified by a compelling State interest achieved by the least restrictive means.” Those voting YES argued that a constitutional amendment is necessary to protect abortion rights in case Roe v. Wade is overturned. Those voting NO may or may not be in favor of greater abortion protections, but argued that the vaguely worded language in Proposal 5 that does not mention ‘abortion’ is so ambiguous that any number of judicial interpretations could be reached.

Labor - NO

Approve Burlington's Heating Regulations and Other Amendments (H.448). Passed on February 22, 2022 by a vote of 96-47. H.448 would regulate “thermal energy systems in residential and commercial buildings.” Those voting YES wish to echo residents’ desire to make Burlington as “sustainable as possible.” Those voting NO believe “regulating thermal energy systems” could worsen Vermont’s housing shortage. Regulations in Burlington could lead to reduced housing supply in other nearby towns. Any legislation addressing a state priority like climate change should be done across the state, rather than in one municipality. Especially if it worsens another state priority like housing.

Labor - NO

Restrict Burlington’s Lawful Rental Evictions (H.708). Passed on February 18, 2022 by a vote of 98-49. H.708 removes the blanket permission Burlington landlords have to not renew a tenant’s lease, and lays out acceptable reasons landlords may evict tenants. Those voting YES believe Burlington tenants need better protection from eviction than they currently have. Those voting NO believe contracts between landlord and tenant should lived up to on both sides, without more government interference. The proposal could end up reducing Burlington’s housing supply if landlords are more cautious to put housing on the rental market.

Labor - NO

Work Remotely in Vermont House (H.R. 13). Passed on January 4, 2022 by a vote of 106-19. H.R. 13 would allow the House to conduct business remotely for the first two weeks of the 2022 legislative session. Those voting YES believe that Covid and the risk it poses to legislators and to legislative staff is significant enough that in-person lawmaking should be temporarily suspended, moving much of that work to Zoom. Those voting NO believe that legislators should not exempt themselves from a risk that teachers, healthcare providers, retail workers and grocery employees and others shouldering the risk of Covid to keep Vermont’s economy going.

Labor - YES

Remove References to Slavery in Constitution (Proposal 2). Passed on February 4, 2022 by a vote of 139-3. Proposal 2 would amend Vermont’s state Constitution to remove reference to slavery. Those voting YES believe it is necessary to clarify the illegality of slavery in the state Constitution. Those voting NO believe this is an unnecessary act of "virtue signaling" that has no impact on the Vermonters living today, but disrespects and to some extent "erases" Vermont's history as the first state to outlaw slavery in the Union.

Labor - NO






Took office in 2022

No legislative action to report yet! Check back later this year.